Green Cuties Farm

Fall City, WA, to Kent, WA

“Cheese Cave” in Springfield, Missouri Photo Credit: Brown Political Review
From left to right: Luis Yepiz, Ben Collier, and Sophia Adelle on Capitol Hill for The United Fresh Conference.
Storm surge floods the parking lot to McElroy’s Harbor House restaurant in Mississippi on August 26 as Hurricane Ida approached. Hannah Ruhoff
Photo credit: SunHerald.com
Rebecca Isaacson
August 25, 2020

At The Farmlink Project, our work with farms does not solely focus on maximizing the amount of produce we can move—we also do our best to reach the smaller farms that have struggled immensely during this economic crisis. Green Cuties is one of these smaller farms with which we are proud to partner. Last week, The Farmlink Project worked with Green Cuties to deliver 45 pounds of kale bunches to Northwest Harvest in Kent, Washington.

Green Cuties, a small family farm in Fall City, Washington, is owned and operated by second-generation Hmong farmers, Pachia Cha and her husband, Joe. They started the farm five years ago with the help of Joe’s parents, Laotian refugees who had been farming for over 30 years since they immigrated to America after the Vietnam War, and it has since grown into the flourishing family farm it is today. As Pachia explained, “With much encouragement, determination, and trial and error, we have learned enough to have a successful farm. However, we are still learning every year.” Her humility and desire to learn how to improve are traits that we all could learn from and we, at The Farmlink Project, aspire to embody.

With no other employees, Pachia and Joe do all the work themselves to run Green Cuties, overseeing “every little step and making sure everything is done correctly from seed germination to harvesting” across their two-acre farm. Running this farm is no small feat, particularly given the postponed opening of the farmers markets that Green Cuties relies on to sell their produce and flowers. Pachia described how tentative the markets were to open due to the COVID-19 crisis, delaying opening for a month. “We were not sure if we would be able to sell anything with the massive closure of businesses and markets.” Thankfully, they were able to make it work, though they had to “scramble” to get everything done and ready.

As we have learned time and again at The Farmlink Project, even something small can make a huge difference. We are incredibly proud to partner with family farms like Green Cuties and look forward to continuing and developing our partnership.

< Back
No items found.
Farms and Food Banks

Green Cuties Farm

Fall City, WA, to Kent, WA

August 25, 2020

At The Farmlink Project, our work with farms does not solely focus on maximizing the amount of produce we can move—we also do our best to reach the smaller farms that have struggled immensely during this economic crisis. Green Cuties is one of these smaller farms with which we are proud to partner. Last week, The Farmlink Project worked with Green Cuties to deliver 45 pounds of kale bunches to Northwest Harvest in Kent, Washington.

Green Cuties, a small family farm in Fall City, Washington, is owned and operated by second-generation Hmong farmers, Pachia Cha and her husband, Joe. They started the farm five years ago with the help of Joe’s parents, Laotian refugees who had been farming for over 30 years since they immigrated to America after the Vietnam War, and it has since grown into the flourishing family farm it is today. As Pachia explained, “With much encouragement, determination, and trial and error, we have learned enough to have a successful farm. However, we are still learning every year.” Her humility and desire to learn how to improve are traits that we all could learn from and we, at The Farmlink Project, aspire to embody.

With no other employees, Pachia and Joe do all the work themselves to run Green Cuties, overseeing “every little step and making sure everything is done correctly from seed germination to harvesting” across their two-acre farm. Running this farm is no small feat, particularly given the postponed opening of the farmers markets that Green Cuties relies on to sell their produce and flowers. Pachia described how tentative the markets were to open due to the COVID-19 crisis, delaying opening for a month. “We were not sure if we would be able to sell anything with the massive closure of businesses and markets.” Thankfully, they were able to make it work, though they had to “scramble” to get everything done and ready.

As we have learned time and again at The Farmlink Project, even something small can make a huge difference. We are incredibly proud to partner with family farms like Green Cuties and look forward to continuing and developing our partnership.

Farms and Food Banks
Rebecca Isaacson

Rebecca Isaacson joined The Farmlink Project in May 2020, soon after its inception, and has served as Head of the Impact Team since fall 2020. In leading and writing for the Impact Team, she strives to tell the stories that are rarely told about the realities of food insecurity, the agriculture industry, and the food space so as to educate our readers and hopefully inspire them to support our mission. Beyond the impactful mission that The Farmlink Project team seeks to achieve, her favorite thing about being a part of this team is the incredible and passionate community she is surrounded by each day (even though it's only through Zoom!). Rebecca is a proud Bostonian and is currently pursuing a degree in Government with a minor in Computer Science from Colby College.


Green Cuties Farm

Fall City, WA, to Kent, WA

August 25, 2020

At The Farmlink Project, our work with farms does not solely focus on maximizing the amount of produce we can move—we also do our best to reach the smaller farms that have struggled immensely during this economic crisis. Green Cuties is one of these smaller farms with which we are proud to partner. Last week, The Farmlink Project worked with Green Cuties to deliver 45 pounds of kale bunches to Northwest Harvest in Kent, Washington.

Green Cuties, a small family farm in Fall City, Washington, is owned and operated by second-generation Hmong farmers, Pachia Cha and her husband, Joe. They started the farm five years ago with the help of Joe’s parents, Laotian refugees who had been farming for over 30 years since they immigrated to America after the Vietnam War, and it has since grown into the flourishing family farm it is today. As Pachia explained, “With much encouragement, determination, and trial and error, we have learned enough to have a successful farm. However, we are still learning every year.” Her humility and desire to learn how to improve are traits that we all could learn from and we, at The Farmlink Project, aspire to embody.

With no other employees, Pachia and Joe do all the work themselves to run Green Cuties, overseeing “every little step and making sure everything is done correctly from seed germination to harvesting” across their two-acre farm. Running this farm is no small feat, particularly given the postponed opening of the farmers markets that Green Cuties relies on to sell their produce and flowers. Pachia described how tentative the markets were to open due to the COVID-19 crisis, delaying opening for a month. “We were not sure if we would be able to sell anything with the massive closure of businesses and markets.” Thankfully, they were able to make it work, though they had to “scramble” to get everything done and ready.

As we have learned time and again at The Farmlink Project, even something small can make a huge difference. We are incredibly proud to partner with family farms like Green Cuties and look forward to continuing and developing our partnership.

Farms and Food Banks
Rebecca Isaacson

Rebecca Isaacson joined The Farmlink Project in May 2020, soon after its inception, and has served as Head of the Impact Team since fall 2020. In leading and writing for the Impact Team, she strives to tell the stories that are rarely told about the realities of food insecurity, the agriculture industry, and the food space so as to educate our readers and hopefully inspire them to support our mission. Beyond the impactful mission that The Farmlink Project team seeks to achieve, her favorite thing about being a part of this team is the incredible and passionate community she is surrounded by each day (even though it's only through Zoom!). Rebecca is a proud Bostonian and is currently pursuing a degree in Government with a minor in Computer Science from Colby College.


No items found.

Green Cuties Farm

Fall City, WA, to Kent, WA

August 25, 2020

At The Farmlink Project, our work with farms does not solely focus on maximizing the amount of produce we can move—we also do our best to reach the smaller farms that have struggled immensely during this economic crisis. Green Cuties is one of these smaller farms with which we are proud to partner. Last week, The Farmlink Project worked with Green Cuties to deliver 45 pounds of kale bunches to Northwest Harvest in Kent, Washington.

Green Cuties, a small family farm in Fall City, Washington, is owned and operated by second-generation Hmong farmers, Pachia Cha and her husband, Joe. They started the farm five years ago with the help of Joe’s parents, Laotian refugees who had been farming for over 30 years since they immigrated to America after the Vietnam War, and it has since grown into the flourishing family farm it is today. As Pachia explained, “With much encouragement, determination, and trial and error, we have learned enough to have a successful farm. However, we are still learning every year.” Her humility and desire to learn how to improve are traits that we all could learn from and we, at The Farmlink Project, aspire to embody.

With no other employees, Pachia and Joe do all the work themselves to run Green Cuties, overseeing “every little step and making sure everything is done correctly from seed germination to harvesting” across their two-acre farm. Running this farm is no small feat, particularly given the postponed opening of the farmers markets that Green Cuties relies on to sell their produce and flowers. Pachia described how tentative the markets were to open due to the COVID-19 crisis, delaying opening for a month. “We were not sure if we would be able to sell anything with the massive closure of businesses and markets.” Thankfully, they were able to make it work, though they had to “scramble” to get everything done and ready.

As we have learned time and again at The Farmlink Project, even something small can make a huge difference. We are incredibly proud to partner with family farms like Green Cuties and look forward to continuing and developing our partnership.

Farms and Food Banks
Rebecca Isaacson

Rebecca Isaacson joined The Farmlink Project in May 2020, soon after its inception, and has served as Head of the Impact Team since fall 2020. In leading and writing for the Impact Team, she strives to tell the stories that are rarely told about the realities of food insecurity, the agriculture industry, and the food space so as to educate our readers and hopefully inspire them to support our mission. Beyond the impactful mission that The Farmlink Project team seeks to achieve, her favorite thing about being a part of this team is the incredible and passionate community she is surrounded by each day (even though it's only through Zoom!). Rebecca is a proud Bostonian and is currently pursuing a degree in Government with a minor in Computer Science from Colby College.


Green Cuties Farm
Fall City, WA, to Kent, WA

Related Posts